CyberSpy

Rantings from a guy with way too much free time

Baby it's Cold Outside -- How Cold? Use an SHT31 and See!

2019-01-29 15 minute read programming Rob Baruch
ESP32 and SHT31 Temperature and Humidity Sensor Secure Web Server In this blog post, I follow-up on the ESP32-IDF development and demonstrate how to incorporate an i2c device to measure the temperature and humidity. Specifically the SHT31. First, let’s do it plain-jane vanilla. We’ll incorporate the i2c device and simply display the measurements to the serial terminal through the uart. Next, we’ll make it more practical and send the data over the wifi network to a service that makes it convenient to visualize the time-series data. Continue reading

Program the Esp32 with ESP-IDF on Mac OS X

2019-01-23 9 minute read programming Rob Baruch
Programming the ESP32 on your Mac! Go out and buy yourself a cheap little ESP32 SoC and follow these basic instructions to setup your development environment on your Mac. If you want to do some advanced C-programming to control your ESP32, this is for you. If you’d rather use Arduino and play with simple sketches then this is not for you – google how to use Arduino and off you go! Continue reading

Making some Noise - Teensy, TGA-Pro, and MIDI

2018-05-04 12 minute read programming Rob Baruch
Making Some Noise (and maybe even Music)! In this blog post, I’ll share my experiences using the Teensy and TGA-Pro Guitar Audio Shield to process audio - both using an audio processing codec as well as MIDI. I’ve also included the Yamaha UX16 USB-to-MIDI controller to aid in patching my MIDI channels into the inputs of the Guitar Audio shield. Teensy - Yet antother cheap USB uController board. At the hear of this project is the Teensy 3. Continue reading

Pathocaml - Getting Wacky with Functions And Polymorphism

2018-03-19 7 minute read programming Rob Baruch
OCaml on the Fringes - You can do that?? So, I got bored this afternoon and was contemplating why I was enjoying diving into OCaml more than say Elixir/Erlang for functional programming. The quality of the language that’s most captured my attention is the type system. When you start playing around with the type system in OCaml you can go from some basic definitions of user-defined types to some pretty cool looking constructs. Continue reading

OCaml OpenGL - Get into Gear!

2018-03-13 10 minute read programming Rob Baruch
OCaml and OpenGL - Getting our Functional Programming into Gear! In my blog post for this day, I thought I’d take a look at the OCaml OpenGL library, lablgl. If you’re not already familair with openGL, I strongly suggest that you take a look at one of the tutorials available online. One that I found to be very informative; although written in c++, is opengl-tutorial. Nonetheless, in this post, we’ll look at some simple, and not so simple examples written in OCaml. Continue reading

Exercism - Get your Code Deamons Out! Heal Your Body!

2018-02-28 4 minute read programming Rob Baruch
Exercis(m) The best way to keep the mind, body, and soul sharp is to exercise! No better way to learn new programming paradigms than following this same precept when learning new concepts in an unfamiliar programming language. There are several sites online that afford noobs practice problems - Hackerrank, kaggle to name a few. But one that I recently came across, exercism.io, aims to provide not just programming exercises, but a community of folks committed to commenting and sharing both code and criticism on implementations to problem sets across many languages. Continue reading

Riding the Camel Deeper into the Desert of Code: Records and Variants

2018-02-11 13 minute read programming Rob Baruch
Extending and Encapsulating Data - Records and Variants Up next on our tour of OCaml are records and variants. If you are familiar with typedef, struct, and union in c/c++, you’ll quickly come to understand how to use records and variants in OCaml. We’ll start off looking at records, how to define them, use them in functions, and automatically generate common functions from our type definitions. There’s more to the eye than what you get in a language like c, so pay close attention as we move through the descriptions below. Continue reading
Older posts